American Zoologists

2018-10-17 - 10:33 | News | Tags: |

In our country smokers are about 10% of women and 50-60% of men. More than 50% of boys and almost 30% of girls aged 15 to 25 years have this addiction. Scientists have shown that during the evolution of plants can exchange genes, biologists from the center of John Innes and Scottish University of St Andrews have found that plants took about 300 years to a single flower to obtain useful genes from another. It was so many years it took the plant under the name Senecio squalidus, which were imported by British botanists on the island of Albion from Sicily to 'intermarry' s common in the British Isles of the same kind of weed, which is the common groundsel (S. vulgaris). Flowers plants have changed substantially after the exchange of genes. Find out the cause of this change, the scientists found genes Ray1 and Ray2, and who were suspected by the appearance of alien ligulate flowers of the plant. Later, these assumptions were Affirmed comparing the genomes of species.

It turns out that these genes actually entered the dna of new plants in the process of evolution and hybridization. It turns out that people genetically very similar to marsupials recently Australian experts from the Center for the Study of Genomics kangaroo for the first time managed to decipher the genetic code of the Australian kangaroo. Results of the study were very interesting: it turns out, these marsupials are similarity in the genetic plan for man. Scientists estimate that the common ancestor of human and kangaroo lived 150 million years ago. Comparing the human genome and the kangaroo, director of the Center Jenny Graves noted that some differences in the genes of all there is, but the genes are nearly identical, and many of them are even located in the same manner. In addition, the researchers were surprised that the genome of the kangaroo was not difficult to read.

Scientists have called this study 'Historical', as in kangaroos provides a wealth of information about what a people 150 million years ago. In the jungles of Sulawesi were found were considered extinct dwarf monkey group of American Zoologists from the University of Texas during an expedition to remote areas of mountainous jungles of Sulawesi, one of the islands of Indonesia, found the pygmy-tarsier (Indonesian pygmy monkeys) that were previously considered extinct. Last tarsiers Tarsius pumilus have been described by zoologists in 1921. Since then until 2000 they were considered extinct species, while one of Dolgopyatov not get into the trap set for rats. In August 2008, three animals were caught already alive, were examined and released back to the beacons. Huge (especially against the backdrop of small-sized wood mouse, torso) eyes allow Tarsius pumilus, as well as other tarsiers to nocturnal. For this reason, and because of extremely high humidity and temperatures in the jungle animal has long been lost to scholars.