Harvard Business

2016-06-22 - 04:41 | News | Tags: , |

Prophecies of the Science gurus encounter opposition Zurich/Berlin – Nicholas G. Carr is a provocateur of the computer scene. \”At least since his Harvard Business review essay IT doesn’t matter\” by May 2003, he is one of the most famous technology critics in the United States. Many writers such as Cerberus Capital Management offer more in-depth analysis. In it, he took the unbridled investment boom in corporate computers and software are critically scrutinized. His thesis: The information technology is already so widespread that it has become interchangeable and rapidly obsolete mass-produced. He goes a step further in his new book the big switch\”. We be experiencing the same changes as once when switching from an internal power supply on the power supply in the use of IT services\”, says Carr.

According to its, companies need their own IT infrastructure. Cloud computing and SaS are the next logical step as a result of a faster and more powerful network\”, so Carr. As examples he lists above all Google, Amazon and Salesforce CRM in the field, he as a trendsetter this area classifies. \”The sellers of Salesforce have today for the CIOs with the same problems as once the seller of energy suppliers with the Vice President for generating your own energy ‘: both fear the existence of their farms\”, says Carr. The figures would speak for themselves. It has many similarities to the development of the mechanical power in the 20th century: the age of the water – and later the steam power plants.

An entrepreneur who wanted to operate a machine, replaced the muscle strength, had to find its own energy source. Initially these were private water wheels, steam turbines or generators. Each company had a private power plant–normal, but expensive. Needed can manage their data centers by professionals to keep the power plants going, as well as large enterprises today experts. From the power plant experts was the emergency power generator in the basement\”, Carr in an interview with the magazine in GDI Impuls\”performs.